5 crucial tips to help you stand out at work

By Scot Herrick | Job Performance

Oct 26

It can be tough to stand out in a company of talented individuals. Especially if you work for a large corporation, you may wonder how you will be able to make your mark. However, there are plenty of ways to stand out in a corporate environment with a little extra effort. Here are 5 suggestions:

Ask Questions

You’re at a conference table with a group of coworkers. Your boss has just explained a new process that sparked several questions in your mind. You know you need the answers to them to be able to perform well but you doubt yourself. Are the questions silly? Do others already know the answers? You worry that you will look ignorant if you ask your question. Don’t let your fears stop you. If you have a question, ask it!

Asking questions and recording the answers may be the single most important part of your learning process, particularly during the employee onboarding process.  Asking questions shows your assertiveness and that you care about doing quality work. It shows that you want to communicate. It also shows that you are not afraid to be corrected. Rather than making you look foolish, asking questions will be the thing that will help you avoid foolish mistakes. Your managers will notice that you are asking questions and will have more confidence in you because of it.

Be Honest

 Honesty is an essential on the list of character traits employers look for. Everyone is trying to carve their path to a successful career in a highly competitive business world. There can be a lot of pressure to cut corners to try to get ahead of someone else. It is important to realize that performance will come and go, but character stays.

It is more important to be an honest employee whose work is high quality than it is to always be first on the leaderboard. Titles or compensation are never worth compromising your integrity and your boss will agree. In a world where so many people allow themselves to be less than honest at work, being an employee who has firm integrity will help you stand out.

Speak Out & Contribute

When you’re sitting in a meeting and you have an idea that you think would be great for a client, speak it! You have things to contribute – that’s why you were hired. Don’t be afraid to share your ideas and experience. Avoid being domineering or only speaking your mind when a company executive is around. Doing this won’t help you much but consistently contributing your bright ideas will. Your managers will see that you really care about your job success.

Bring Cheer to the Office

The daily grind can be, well, a grind. If you come to work with that attitude, it will rub off on those around you. Even your job is a difficult one, there are ways to make any job better. If you come in with a smile on your face every morning, make an effort to get to know your coworkers and go out of your way to make the office a brighter place, you will stand out from those who keep to themselves. Kindness goes a long way to help you stand out in a large group of people and your efforts won’t go unnoticed in the office.

Own Up to Your Mistakes

 There is nothing more mature than being able to admit when you are wrong. If you find out you have made a mistake, immediately do what you can to make it right. If it’s something you need help from management to fix, do not wait to tell them. Your boss will be grateful that you are going to fix your work mistake. It is better to face your mistake and take the proper steps to fix it than to try to hide it. Many people like to minimize their mistakes. Taking full ownership for yours will set you apart.


Annabelle Smyth is a freelance writer who covers everything from HR to technology and leadership skills. Her most recent work involves partnership marketing with Bamboo HR where she has had the opportunity to learn about the relationship between leadership and successful businesses.

Follow

About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.