How your resume fits into your job search strategy

By Scot Herrick | Job Search

Mar 07

You do have a job search strategy, right? Right?

I have strong opinions on resumes — from how they are structured, the words you use, what counts as a deliverable…lots of stuff.

But I always come back to this truth: the resume gets you the interview. It does not get you the job.

Your job search strategy is the silver bullet — not job boards

The resume is not the silver bullet in a job search. Your job search strategy is the silver bullet — and the strategy involves lots of business networking, informational interviews, practicing answering your job interview questions, and keeping your nose to the grindstone.

You get on Monster and you’ll get lost in the masses. You get on a specialty job board that specifically addresses your job search area and your chances of not getting lost improves.

And you know that a LOT of jobs posted on job boards are fake jobs — jobs that are posted for policy reasons already filled by an internal employee or by companies seeking out names and resumes to see what is going on in the market.

But job boards also inform you of the types of job skills you need to have a better opportunity at the interview — as long as your resume lists the job skills.

Your resume is your calling card

The importance of your resume is this: after you have done your “internal reviews” about what you want out of a job, after you have reviewed your company targets, and after you have made contacts with people you know in your target companies, your resume becomes your calling card.

Your resume gets shown to people — HR people, hiring managers, people on your potential team.

And if your resume sucks, you won’t get the interview. Even after all that hard work getting you to the point where someone says, “why don’t you give me your resume and I’ll see what I can do.”

But a great resume? Now there’s the job interview ticket.

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.