4 Entry Level Jobs in Engineering You Haven’t Considered Yet

By Scot Herrick | Job Search

Jul 05

The conventional job market is filled with conventional jobs, unless you’re a larger-than-life personality or in the top half-percent productivity-wise, the difficulty in getting from graduation to a career-track job is getting noticed. If you’re in engineering it can be especially difficult to find a place where you can find a career in the long term. Entry level work is tedious and hard to find, and your first job at the entry level is where you get employers’ attention. So why not make that first job unusual enough to put you at the front of the line?

Maritime Engineer

The United States Coast Guard issues licenses to members of the United States Merchant Marine, and one of the classifications is Engineer. Every civilian vessel operating in U.S. waters is required to meet a wide variety of complex mechanical and technological requirements. It is the Merchant Marine Engineer who makes those certifications possible.

Not only will you gain a huge amount of experience working with fascinating equipment, but you’ll land your next job with some amazing stories. It’s a great start and will help your chances getting the next job.

Attraction Engineer

There are hundreds of amusement parks, theme parks, outdoor shopping centers, carnivals, zoos, wild animal preserves, and tourist attractions in the United States alone, to say nothing of the rest of the world.

Every one of those parks and attractions requires continuous maintenance, upgrades, testing, safety certification, and sometimes even new designs. The average engineer will very likely never even think of applying for these jobs, and they can very easily lead to an exclusive career that makes a rock star’s life look boring.

Technology Engineers

You may not think an engineering degree can get you into computer work, but there are so many ways engineers can put their skills to use here. From creating rigid and flexible circuit boards to testing new technology equipment, engineers are needed in many different capacities.

From technology corporations like Streamline Circuits to manufactures around the world, engineers are sure to find a way to put their skills to good use.

Theatrical Engineer

If you think theme parks rely on engineering, you simply won’t believe what a modern theatrical production needs. Consider for a moment what working at the Super Bowl or the Orange Bowl would look like on your resume. Or how about building the infrastructure for the president’s Inauguration Address, or building the media center for the Daytona 500?

Every major media and theatrical production requires knowledgeable and flexible engineers who can think on their feet and meet exacting deadlines. And if you want to talk about a career where you get to network with people, nothing beats a Westwood film premiere or a Broadway opening night.

If you’re one of the people who made the night possible, you’re going to be at the top of everyone’s get-to-know list, and that can lead to amazing opportunities later.

The truth is there are opportunities all over for engineers to put their unique knowledge and abilities to work making things better for companies, schools, event organizers and their audiences. If you really want an exciting start, the possibilities are endless. Just think outside the box and find a career that will keep you interested in years to come.

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most her time hiking, biking and gardening. For more information contact Brooke via Twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Photo by KellarW


About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.