3 Reasons to Categorize Job Skills on a Resume

By Scot Herrick | Job Search

Feb 09

If you look at job descriptions today, you’ll find that employers are looking for a number of job skills to do the work. Some employers even think some obscene number of job skills are the minimum requirements for a job. Maybe for rocket scientists — but regardless, having lots of job skills needed in a job description means needing a lot of job skills on your resume.

Why?

Because the more your job skills match those on the job description, the more likely you are to get an interview. And, as you should know by now, getting the interview is the only purpose of a resume.

Then there is the whole issue of someone looking at your resume and trying to figure out (since the resume reader machine found them!) which job skills match up to the job description.

It’s not enough to have your job skills on your resume. You have to make it easy for an HR human to match them to a job description. Sure, you could list your fifty job skills on the first page, but that doesn’t make finding a specific one easy.

My suggestion?

Categorize your job skills.

One big list of job skills diminishes the importance of all of them

When you read a lot of resumes, your scanning the resume to see if you should interview — or more likely reject — a resume. Recruiters do that in under 10-seconds. Having a long, difficult-to-find job skills list increases the chances of you getting thrown into the electronic trash bin. Well, at least your resume…

Soft skills should be separated from hard skills

All those skills relating to playing in the sandbox well with others should be grouped together. They are on the job description, so separate them out on your resume.

Categorization makes it easier to match the job skills to the job description

Put all your programming languages you know together, for example. Put all of your certifications together. Put all of your financial skills together (budgeting, auditing, regulated accounting…). Whatever your position, group your skills into categories to make it easier to match a job description.

How do you do that? Go look at ten or so job descriptions for jobs that you qualify for — whether you are looking or not, since your resume needs to be up-to-date — and it will quickly become apparent which job skills are important and how they should be organized.

How do you group your job skills on your resume?

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.