Why you need to get more impressed with your work

By Scot Herrick | Job Skills

May 08

Your resume should show business accomplishments from your work. Yet, when you sit down to figure out what those accomplishments are, your mind turns into a blank slate. Nothing there. Can’t think of anything.

While some of that is because we just don’t do a good job of writing down our accomplishments when they occur, there’s another sneaky little villain holding many of us back: ego.

Yes, many of us have egos that beat ourselves up if we start to think our work is important. Or that the accomplishment is, in fact, ours and not everyone else’s. That we were just lucky to be along for the ride.

That timid ego will fail you exactly the moment you need to get your accomplishments down on the resume — or tout them during an interview.

What does your ego need to look for?

What went really well in the last three months

Sometimes, what we think is easy is actually hard for other people to do. Just because you think it was easy doesn’t mean the job market thinks it was easy. In fact, often what we think is “easy” is a job market strength for us.

Doing those ten charts that distills thousands of data points from your whiz-bang database? That’s not easy, that’s a strength.

Finishing that project while breezing around the obstacles given to you by your team? That’s not easy, that’s a strength.

Start with what’s easy for you to do and look for the accomplishments.

Business results in reports

If you have SMART goals — or at least goals that are measurable — go back and look at the measurements taken for the goals. When you see that you made your goals as shown through the measurements, don’t think of that as not worth mentioning — it’s fantastic. Goals are not easy to hit and are difficult to measure, given how management has such a hard time figuring out goals to give you.

Have that ego look at those measurements with a new eye toward achievement; something worthy to proclaim to others in your resume.

Compliments from your manager or coworkers

If you are getting compliments about your work, use those compliments to investigate areas where you are doing great. You shy ego belittles those compliments when, in fact, those compliments show some of your best work. Look behind the compliment to see what you did and how you did it. That becomes something to add to your resume about your work.

You still need to write your accomplishments

Your mind is a terrible place to store data and facts. Once you have your ego looking at the things the right way, you still need to write the accomplishments down.

Regardless: Get more impressed with your work. It makes it easier to access and move your accomplishments into your resume and interviews.

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.