Office Fitness For Career Success

By Scot Herrick | Job Performance

Feb 14

Why is fitness in the office so important? Is it just a question of healthy body, healthy mind? This does play a part because a career is built over many years, if you don’t want to find yourself flaking out early on in your career you need to take care of yourself day in and day out.

For the Tim Ferris’s of this world this might be a non issue because if you only spend 4 hours sitting at your office desk it’s not worth worrying about office wellbeing. But for most of us, we spend a good eight hours there, that can add up to forty plus hours a week, much more in my case. If you don’t want to end up shaped like a well endowed avocado, then doing a few brief exercises at the office on a regular basis, coupled with the right diet, will go a long way to helping you develop a healthy lifestyle. This will take you over to your real life at home and make for a much more balanced and successful life.

Getting enough exercise enables you to sleep better and then enjoy what you do during your time off. Motivation is the key to all of this, and I’ll give you a bit of inspiration towards your fitness goal. Of course, there is no better motivation than looking at yourself in the full length mirror every morning when you roll out of bed! But some of us need more than that, motivational quotes can help a lot.

Motivational quotes are a great way to keep you motivated with your office fitness program. It can be as simple as putting the word or phrase on a post-it note on your computer or you can have it on your desktop so you can see it every time you use your computer. It does need to be somewhere you will see it every day.

OK, now we are ready, you’ve got your motivation here are a few quick and easy office exercise tips.

Tip # 1 — Neck & Shoulder Stretch — Sit in your chair and upright, but not stiff. Tuck your chin in and rotate your head carefully and then move each shoulder blade back, in rotation, and hold each side for about thirty seconds.

Tip # 2 — Sit with your feet flat on the floor and pointed straight ahead, without using the backrest. Keep your shoulders back, your chest up and your palms facing forward. Now take four deep breaths filling your lungs from your lower belly first, while concentrating on relaxing as you exhale.

Tip # 3 — Lay on the floor on your stomach with your legs straight and your abdominals drawn inward and your arms straight in front of you. Slowly tuck your chin, tense your buttocks, and pinch your shoulder blades together. At the same time lift your chest off the floor while moving your arms out and around to the sides of your body. Hold this position for about 2 seconds and slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 12 times.

You can exercise pretty much anytime in the day but always do these exercises before you eat, never after. So make your lunch break an exercise one as well but do things in the right order. Walk to a restaurant, go skating, visit a gym for half an hour, or just generally move around for a few minutes. Breathe in the fresh air.

Fluids are important too. Always drink enough fluids and eat small energizing meals during the day. A good quality bottled water is the best drink you can have sitting on your office desk. And make sure you get ample fruit and vegetables, if you afford organic, all the better. Doing all this is no guarantee for career success but long term it will help. You also have to be in right career, but then that’s another subject!

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Lloyd Burrell enjoys writing about home and corporate office desks particularly but also many related subjects such as office fitness, nutrition, etiquette, organization, and home office creation. Lloyd is the publisher of an office desk review website where he publishes detailed reviews on, traditional wood office desks, contemporary office desks in glass and metal and computer office desk furniture.

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.