Career Management Requires Knowing How Work Works

By Scot Herrick | Cube Rules Commentary

Oct 17

Most career management sites simply tell you how to build your resume, find a new job, and maybe give you some tips on interviewing. Yet, the career management practice is much more than simplified resume writing. Career management is everything from doing well in your job right now to strategically determining the best industry to be in the next five years. Outside of your specific job skills for your work (knowing how to program Java…), what are the skills you need for career management?

Let’s create a good list of what skills you need to know to protect and enhance your career:

  • Creating business goals
  • Writing your own performance review
  • Writing status reports
  • Communicating with your manager about your work and performance
  • How stock options and restricted stock options vest
  • How your 401(k) is invested
  • How to sell your stocks in your 401(k) to cash without incurring a penalty
  • How your bonus is determined
  • Creating an effective task management system
  • How to build a network of relationships to support your career
  • How to market your personal brand
  • How to use your personal computer and the software programs your company uses to get work done
  • How to understand Corporate Speak so you understand what is really being said by management
  • How to research your company and industry to make sure what the market and management say matches
  • How to create an effective resume
  • How to interview for a different position

None of this addresses the skills you have to do your work, of course. That will vary with every individual. But being skilled in the topics on this list will translate to you being a more effective employee and enhancing your career.

What others have I missed?

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.