Would you take this position?

By Scot Herrick | Job Search

Jul 10

How management defines the importance of projects is critical to Cubicle Warriors. And to management.

When we evaluate positions, there are certain assumptions that go along with that evaluation. If you are interviewing for a new position, whether in your current company or not, there are benchmarks that use that make you feel comfortable about the position.

Still challenging, of course. Still a position that will add to your skills. But benchmarks that don’t send alarm bells going off in your head.

What are those benchmarks?

  • Budget for the project. If management can’t recognize the importance of the project by budgeting dollars for it, how important can it be?
  • Management for the project. Each project should have clear management accountability for the project parts. Without these in place, chaos rules.
  • How the team works. If it is a new project, there should be an outline of how each member of the team will contribute work to the project. This changes over time, of course, but if management hasn’t figured out an approach, you’ll waste months figuring it out.

Now imagine you are interviewing for this position on this project. You’ve got the skills and want to do the work.

Then you are told that there isn’t a budget. Not only isn’t there a budget, but the management for the project is simply borrowed ad hoc as they have time from their day jobs. And the team is really trying to get help from other skilled people who are not on the project. Like, beg for help.

By the way, this story is real. What advice would you give to this person? Would you recommend taking the position? Why or why not? What else would you want to know?

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.