Book Review: Two Weeks to a Breakthrough

By Scot Herrick | Book Reviews

Jun 26

New projects are a challenge. A challenge to start, to complete the various tasks, and to see through to the end. And if you have a goal — but don’t know how to get to the goal — it’s tough figuring out where to begin.

Lisa Haneberg has it figured out. In her book, “Two Weeks to a Breakthrough — how to zoom toward your goal in 14 days or less,” she tells us how.

What she learned

Breakthroughs are the result of our mind-set and our actions. The interesting takeaway for Lisa in her previous training was that those who succeeded the most were the ones that worked on their goals daily. With this result, she designed a method to reach a breakthrough by doing work every day. The result is sharing the program with us through this great book.

The program review

Breakthroughs can happen through the smallest of actions. But small actions, when combined, can have dramatic results. Combine these small actions into a daily routine and you get the shortened time frame to break through to your goal.

In essence, Lisa designed a two-week program that, when performed daily, should produce a breakthrough for you. Each daily practice helps you break through resistance to your goal, ask for help, practice focusing, and performing tasks on your goal.

It sounds simple. And that’s the beauty of the approach.

Why small actions?

Small actions are simpler to carry out. We overwhelm ourselves thinking we need to carry out big milestones to succeed. Lisa pointedly debunks large tasks as necessary for a breakthrough:

Small actions can move mountains and shift realities. Small actions applied consistently will do nothing less than change the world. Small becomes big.

These small actions include tasks with your goal, but also in how you talk to people about what you want to do. It is, in a unique view, a way to network with people about the goals you are working.

Review

Two Weeks to a Breakthrough gives you a solid method of achieving a breakthrough for your goal. Lisa includes solid theory with practical actions from the participants themselves in the book. This real-world application of theory and practice is excellent.

Cube Rules Rating (1 – 5 Cubes, with 5 being the best)

I rated the book as 5 Cubes. A practical book to help Cubicle Warriors succeed achieving breakthroughs in their life.

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.

  • David Zinger says:

    Scot:
    Lisa’s book is one of my favorites because you can create a breakthrough and it is clearly articulated. It was working with Lisa’s perspective that transformed my own website and helped me create the employee engagement network.
    Thanks for the reminder, it is time to pull the book off of my shelf and create a summer July breakthrough.
    David

    • Scot Herrick says:

      @David Zinger
      Lisa has some very good books out, indeed. Plus, she is an engaging person who really knows her stuff. I was very happy to both meet her and to review the book.

  • Scot – thanks so much for the kind words (David, too) about Two Weeks. It remains my favorite book and I hope that you and your readers experience many breakthroughs.

  • HL Arledge says:

    Lisa’s “High Impact Middle Management” is one of my all-time favorites, but it sounds like this one provides a strategy I can really use. Next stop, Amazon.

    • Scot Herrick says:

      @HL Arledge
      “High Impact Middle Management” is a great book. There are few books that address the subject and I’d highly recommend it as well.

      Two Weeks is different in it addresses the ability to do significant transformational work at a personal level for either business or your life. So the context is different. There were great examples of this in the book and in my conversation with her. It is simple — but highly effective.

  • Jason Moore says:

    Great book! Just read it. I’m trying to figure how this methodology would apply within the GTD framework. With the numerous larger scale projects (not projects that are comprised of a handful of actions), I think the amount of things to do over two weeks would be overwhelming! For example, an action blitz on Day 11 for 5 projects would yield (yikes) 50 actions!

    What are your thoughts on this? Should I apply this methodology to the biggest of projects? Ones that are stuck?

    Thanks!

    • Scot Herrick says:

      @Jason Moore
      The approach of the book is to do 3-4 things consistently every day. This isn’t 50-tasks as such, but rather consistency in your approach. From a GTD perspective, this means these things go on your calendar as something to be done during the day. Then checked off when completed.

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