Killing Your Personal Brand on Trading Spaces

By Scot Herrick | Job Performance

Apr 21

You’ll think I’m nuts, but I like Trading Spaces, the show on TLC where neighbors and/or friends swap houses and remodel one room in 48-hours with $1,000 using the services of the show’s designers and carpenters.

It’s all innocent enough with what I would characterize as minor disagreements with the show’s designers on what to do with a room adding a bit of fun to the show. Face it: if you are on the show, it’s about doing the star’s design for the room. Otherwise, you can do it all yourself without them — why bother?

This past Saturday’s show was different. In it, the men were both architects and the women were an interior designer and the other an interior designer-to-be. Insert the show’s designers into the mix and you have the great opportunity for great rooms.

Instead, the real interior designer continuously displayed a bad attitude about the design, withheld judgement on what was being done, discounted the styles selected, and whined about doing the physical work that needs to be done for a room. As if she should be above it all.

Just so I’m not picky: her husband was just as bad. And the other architect was just as bad as well. And the pretend designer was right there too. All four, in the business, and being total you know what’s.

By the time the show was done, I was ready to shoot the TV.

I’m sure it probably made for some good dramatic television. But I walked away with only one thought: I’d never, ever, hire these home owner architects and designers for anything I would ever do.

They were impolite, stubborn, unwilling to listen and hear the other side, uncooperative, and displayed no signs of collaboration with their peers.

Anything good in their personal brand was dead by the end of the show.

Would you want to hire someone like that?

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.