Do you work for health insurance?

By Scot Herrick | Personal Finance

Nov 27

Here in the United States, most health insurance is graced upon the individual Cubicle Warrior through a health policy provided by their employer. Not all employers, but many.

As a consequence, some 47 million are uninsured and an additional 16 million or so essentially self-insure with programs that don’t kick in until one incurs high deductibles, according to Business Week and their article on “Fresh Pain for the Uninsured.”

The article basically speaks to the fact that hospitals are outsourcing their receivables (not collectibles, receivables) to outside companies in return for a discounted payment to the hospital.

I’m becoming more aware of the multitude of tricks that the health care industry is doing to amp up the payments and revenue from consumers of health care here in the United States — and it isn’t pretty.

Nor are there any easy answers. Hospitals need to be paid for their services (that much?) and consumers need health care.

But, that’s not the point of this article — because books have been written on the subject. The question to me is this: Is one of the significant reasons you stay at a job or decision you make about taking a job revolve around the health care plan that the company may or may not provide?

I know I do. I don’t want to go one day without health insurance — bad as it is — because I can’t trust that I won’t get creamed by a poor driver on the day I don’t have insurance and end up going bankrupt over the result.

How about you?

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.