Simple Personal Brand Messaging

By Scot Herrick | Job Performance

Oct 22

Given the 50,000 places you can put information about yourself in your online newspapers that will help your network, how do you decide where to put your stuff?

Well, you can create your own criteria and do well. But, the world is changing.

Dan Schawbel notes that “LinkedIn might have eliminated the need for traditional resumes.” He might be right. His basic contention: since you are recruited using what is on your social site (e.g., LinkedIn), why have a second resume? Just print your resume from LinkedIn and simplify your life.

Now, we all know it’s not as simple as that — yet.

There is great truth to what Dan is talking about. For example, in my situation, I am building out my personal site — http://scotherrick.com — and trying to turn that into a personal branding site.

While there is a lot of work to be done on that site (I’m working it!), Dan’s post also made me realize that I need to coordinate my LinkedIn profile — which really is pretty poor — with the work I’m doing on my personal career site.

You see, a personal brand is really about the same message getting across using all of the marketing channels one uses to reach potential “customers.” Corporations and politicians call it “staying on message.”

While perhaps excessive given the wonderful uniqueness we all have as human beings, there is a lot of truth to “staying on message.”

What I learned from Dan’s article was that my LinkedIn profile and my career site were not in sync with the same messaging and I need to go fix them. As you are reading this on the day of posting, I haven’t fixed them — but I will.

Here are the two questions for you:

  1. How many places is your name out there online?
  2. Are all of those messages consistent with how you want to be viewed as your personal brand?

More work to be done. It’s a good thing.

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.