30 Career Management tips — Review your interview with a friend

By Scot Herrick | Job Search

Sep 14

This month, I’m providing a career management tip-a-day (along with other posts) to help you trigger your own career management activities.

Today’s tip: Review your interview with a friend.

How close to your own interview are you? If you’re like me, pretty close. You concentrate on the questions, the responses, and carefully look at the reactions you are seeing from the person asking the questions.

Only later, after the job is accepted, do you wonder if those nagging doubts you had after the interview should have been a signal to you that this wasn’t the right position for you.

I have this little voice in my head that looks at a situation and immediately tells me after the event that it was good or it was bad. Unlike you (I hope), I too often ignore the little warning signs in my head that are telling me something isn’t right about this — so turn it down.

Instead, I think I can overcome anything and am willing to look at the situation — not as something that should be avoided — but as something that needs to be overcome.

Then, two years later, I’m still paying for not listening to my little voice in my head that tells me if something is right for me — or not.

A great suggestion is to have a trusted friend or family member listen to your account of an interview. What can come across as “honest” is merely a crude warning, what is considered “inside information” is really a person who likes to gossip, and one who praises Corporate Earth should be considered as one “who doth protest too much.”

A friend can point this out to you because you are too close to the situation and they are hearing it with no emotional investment.

Trust me, it will pay to listen.

Hat tip to Liz Ryan on Business Week Online with “Watch for Interview Warning Signs.”

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About the Author

Scot Herrick is the author of “I’ve Landed My Dream Job–Now What???” and owner of Cube Rules, LLC. Scot has a long history of management and individual contribution in multiple Fortune 100 corporations.

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